Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

yabaiani
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Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby yabaiani » Wed May 06, 2020 9:35 am

So I had a question. My engine is almost done being rebuilt fully and I wanted to know what everyone's thoughts were on the proper engine break in period/process. I was told to run it for 200 miles with break in zinc oil, then come back for an oil change, more break in oil for 500 miles, then regular oil change for that.

I wanted to also install my ITBs and get my Link G4+, dyno and tune done as well. So is it dangerous for the motor to install the ITBs pre-break in and try to tune it? Should I hold off? Here is my full engine build spec below if anyone needs to know. Thank you!

Engine Rebuild Details
Motor has also been Ported, Rough Cut and Gasket Match as well as Rotating Assembly has also been balanced
Genuine Toyota 16v Redtop Pistons & Rings 81.5mm
Molnar Connecting Rods Early Type 40/20
Toda Camshafts 264 Duration, 7.9mm Lift Intake/Exhaust
Toda Valve Springs
Toda Timing Belt Kit
Toda Cam Gears
New/Replaced Every Gasket w/ Genuine Toyota Engine Gaskets (incl are the stem seals)
MRP 4AGE 16v +0.5mm Over Sized Stainless Steel Intake/Exhaust Performance Valves
ACL Race Main Bearings
ACL Thrust Washers
King Rod Bearing
MRP Main Reinforcement Caps
SuperTech Valve Guides
4AGE ARP Main Stud Kit
ARP 4AGE 16v Head Stud Kit
MRP 4AGE 16v 200mm AE86 Light Weight Flywheel
ARP Flywheel Bolts 4age
Techno Toy Tuning Crank Pulley, Water Pump, Alternator Pulley
New Water Pump
New Clutch Slave Cylinder
New Genuine Toyota Engine Motor Mounts
New Transmission Mount
Rebuilt Fuel Injectors by Motor West Performance
New Battery
NGK Iridium Plugs
HKS Racing Suction Air Intake System
KOYO Radiator
KOYO High Pressure Radiator Cap
Techno Toy Tuning Radiator Hoses
Sard Low Temperature Thermostat
Fujitsubo Super EX Header Exhaust Manifold
Fujitsubo Legalis R S-Tail Exhaust Muffler
EXEDY Racing Stage 1 Organic Clutch Kit
ARD Low Resistance High Output Alternator
Silk Road Section Engine Torque Damper Gunmetal
LSD & Tranny Flush w/ Redline 75w90 + Friction Modifier
Fully Rebuilt A/C & Heater w/ new A/C Compressor, Expansion Valve, remanufactured heater core, heater valve, heater cable, blower motor
New fuel tank
New fuel pump
New starter
New Oil Pump for 20v (16v upgrade)
New Clutch Fork
New Toyota Pilot / Spigot Bearing
New Clutch Release Bearing

For ITB Install:
MRP AT Power Billet Throttle Body Kit
MRP 4AGE 16v COP Conversion Kit - Genuine 1NZ Bosch Coils
Turbosmart FPR800 Black with Gauge
Tomei Fuel Pressure Regulator Adapter
Xspurt Injectors 550cc
Link G4+ Atom, 1/8" NPT Air Temp Sensor, 1/8" BSP Water Temp Sensor
AE86 Full RHD Loom suit COPs
Pipercross Filter Box 80mm Suit AT Power Throttles
MRP Trigger Wheel Kit Suit RWD T3 Dual Pulley
AE86 World Vacuum Block
Cusco Oil Catch Can

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jondee86
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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby jondee86 » Thu May 07, 2020 4:34 am

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
I have used the technique described in the mototune article with great success.
Get the engine up to operating temperature by running at a high idle with gentle
movement of the throttle to vary the rpm... throttle on... throttle off... throttle on...
throttle off. Check for leaks and anything loose.

Then drive successive cycles of acceleration and deceleration (engine braking)
increasing the load and rpm in each cycle. Avoid extended idling and long periods
of light load constant speed driving. Use the gears and don't lug the engine by
operating at high load and low rpm. Everyone has their own version that they
like better, but the above works for me :)

Your problem is that I'm guessing you don't have a tune for the ECU and you won't
be able to drive the car until your tuner has spent some time on the dyno to get
a basic tune sorted. However, there is a pretty good chance that your tuner has
done this many times... put a tune together while the car is on the dyno and
run the engine in at the same time. Talk to him.

Cheers... jondee86
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one
persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress
depends on the unreasonable man.

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oldeskewltoy
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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby oldeskewltoy » Thu May 07, 2020 7:53 am

jondee86 wrote:http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
I have used the technique described in the mototune article with great success.
Get the engine up to operating temperature by running at a high idle with gentle
movement of the throttle to vary the rpm... throttle on... throttle off... throttle on...
throttle off. Check for leaks and anything loose.

Then drive successive cycles of acceleration and deceleration (engine braking)
increasing the load and rpm in each cycle. Avoid extended idling and long periods
of light load constant speed driving. Use the gears and don't lug the engine by
operating at high load and low rpm. Everyone has their own version that they
like better, but the above works for me :)

Your problem is that I'm guessing you don't have a tune for the ECU and you won't
be able to drive the car until your tuner has spent some time on the dyno to get
a basic tune sorted. However, there is a pretty good chance that your tuner has
done this many times... put a tune together while the car is on the dyno and
run the engine in at the same time. Talk to him.

Cheers... jondee86



More or less agree with this... although I recommend "drive successive cycles of acceleration and deceleration" these start around 2000-2500, are done in 3rd... and if you can get away with it 4th gear (moderately high loads). You do these about a half dozen times. What you are doing is bedding in the rings.


As far as how many miles with break-on oil - if the rings aren't seated within 200 miles... more break-in oil isn't going to help.
OST Cyl head porting, - viewtopic.php?f=22&t=300

Building a great engine takes knowing the end... before you begin :ugeek:

Enjoy Life... its the only one you get!

yabaiani
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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby yabaiani » Thu May 07, 2020 2:17 pm

oldeskewltoy wrote:
jondee86 wrote:http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
I have used the technique described in the mototune article with great success.
Get the engine up to operating temperature by running at a high idle with gentle
movement of the throttle to vary the rpm... throttle on... throttle off... throttle on...
throttle off. Check for leaks and anything loose.

Then drive successive cycles of acceleration and deceleration (engine braking)
increasing the load and rpm in each cycle. Avoid extended idling and long periods
of light load constant speed driving. Use the gears and don't lug the engine by
operating at high load and low rpm. Everyone has their own version that they
like better, but the above works for me :)

Your problem is that I'm guessing you don't have a tune for the ECU and you won't
be able to drive the car until your tuner has spent some time on the dyno to get
a basic tune sorted. However, there is a pretty good chance that your tuner has
done this many times... put a tune together while the car is on the dyno and
run the engine in at the same time. Talk to him.

Cheers... jondee86



More or less agree with this... although I recommend "drive successive cycles of acceleration and deceleration" these start around 2000-2500, are done in 3rd... and if you can get away with it 4th gear (moderately high loads). You do these about a half dozen times. What you are doing is bedding in the rings.


As far as how many miles with break-on oil - if the rings aren't seated within 200 miles... more break-in oil isn't going to help.



Which break-in oil do you recommend? I was thinking Lucas Break In Oil, but didnt know if I should use SAE 30, or 20w-50 break in oil. Any thoughts?

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jondee86
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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby jondee86 » Thu May 07, 2020 4:17 pm

I used this... http://www.penriteoil.com.au/products/1 ... 40-mineral
... and then this... http://www.penriteoil.com.au/products/h ... 60-mineral
... until I had about 1000km on the engine and then changed to my old favorite Castrol
Magnatec 10W-40semi-synthetic.

You can use whatever brand you like for running-in so long as it is high zinc mineral oil.

Cheers... jondee86
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one
persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress
depends on the unreasonable man.

yabaiani
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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby yabaiani » Thu May 07, 2020 4:53 pm

jondee86 wrote:I used this... http://www.penriteoil.com.au/products/1 ... 40-mineral
... and then this... http://www.penriteoil.com.au/products/h ... 60-mineral
... until I had about 1000km on the engine and then changed to my old favorite Castrol
Magnatec 10W-40semi-synthetic.

You can use whatever brand you like for running-in so long as it is high zinc mineral oil.

Cheers... jondee86



What do you think of this? Lucas Oil ENGINE BREAK-IN OIL ADDITIVE - TB ZINC PLUS

https://lucasoil.com/products/engine-bu ... -zinc-plus

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby jondee86 » Thu May 07, 2020 6:38 pm

I guess if you can't find a running-in oil with the zinc already added, you could
use straight mineral oil with that additive. Just make sure you get a mineral oil
without any friction reducing additives. Oils with friction reducing additives and
synthetic oils impede the bedding in process and should only be used after
running-in has been completed.

Cheers... jondee86
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one
persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress
depends on the unreasonable man.

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby oldeskewltoy » Fri May 08, 2020 8:31 am

jondee86 wrote: Just make sure you get a mineral oil
without any friction reducing additives. Oils with friction reducing additives and
synthetic oils impede the bedding in process and should only be used after
running-in has been completed.

Cheers... jondee86



I've used "Driven BR30", and recommend it to my clients
OST Cyl head porting, - viewtopic.php?f=22&t=300

Building a great engine takes knowing the end... before you begin :ugeek:

Enjoy Life... its the only one you get!

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby cincybranr » Fri May 08, 2020 12:06 pm

It certainly doesn’t look like you skimped on quality parts! Love the build and enjoyed reading all the comments here. I hope to find myself in the same boat next year!
Progress. Not perfection.

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby yabaiani » Thu May 14, 2020 9:24 am

oldeskewltoy wrote:
jondee86 wrote: Just make sure you get a mineral oil
without any friction reducing additives. Oils with friction reducing additives and
synthetic oils impede the bedding in process and should only be used after
running-in has been completed.

Cheers... jondee86



I've used "Driven BR30", and recommend it to my clients



Before I take it to get tuned, do you think I need to purchase a wideband? Which brand do you recommend?

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby jondee86 » Thu May 14, 2020 3:48 pm

I used the Innovate LC-1 (now LC-2) WBO2 controller and DB gauge kit...

Image

Worked fine for me. Sent serial data to my ECU and analog signal to the gauge.
I logged engine performance and AFR out of the ECU with a USB connection.

But there are plenty of options available and everyone has their favorite :)

Cheers... jondee86
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one
persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress
depends on the unreasonable man.

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby yabaiani » Thu May 14, 2020 5:16 pm

jondee86 wrote:I used the Innovate LC-1 (now LC-2) WBO2 controller and DB gauge kit...



Worked fine for me. Sent serial data to my ECU and analog signal to the gauge.
I logged engine performance and AFR out of the ECU with a USB connection.

But there are plenty of options available and everyone has their favorite :)

Cheers... jondee86


You have been so helpful jondee. Would you like to see my ITB Kit? Just got it in today from Barry!

Image

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby jondee86 » Thu May 14, 2020 6:04 pm

Damn !!!! That is some nice hardware !!!! What is the throttle plate (diameter) size in them ?
I hope you got some nice o-ringed bungs to block up the injector openings in the head.

I see that you have 550cc injectors in your list. They are kind of big for a 1600cc N.A. engine
and that might be a problem when it comes to getting a nice idle. Still, with that gear under
the hood a lumpy idle is pretty much mandatory :)

Cheers... jondee86
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one
persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress
depends on the unreasonable man.

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby yabaiani » Thu May 14, 2020 7:04 pm

jondee86 wrote:Damn !!!! That is some nice hardware !!!! What is the throttle plate (diameter) size in them ?
I hope you got some nice o-ringed bungs to block up the injector openings in the head.

I see that you have 550cc injectors in your list. They are kind of big for a 1600cc N.A. engine
and that might be a problem when it comes to getting a nice idle. Still, with that gear under
the hood a lumpy idle is pretty much mandatory :)

Cheers... jondee86


They are 45mm. I also bought the injector plugs from Techno Toy Tuning.

And Barry mentioned that the Xspurt injectors have a lot of control with my Link G4+ ECU.

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby jondee86 » Thu May 14, 2020 10:07 pm

Yeah, I had a look and those injectors are slightly modified Bosch high resistance
injectors, and they should be good down to very low opening times. Don't lose the
dead time (latency) information supplied with the injectors as that will be needed
when setting up your ECU.

Cheers... jondee86
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one
persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress
depends on the unreasonable man.

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby yabaiani » Fri May 15, 2020 11:58 am

jondee86 wrote:Yeah, I had a look and those injectors are slightly modified Bosch high resistance
injectors, and they should be good down to very low opening times. Don't lose the
dead time (latency) information supplied with the injectors as that will be needed
when setting up your ECU.

Cheers... jondee86


With my new ITB setup, Bary said that I didn't need an idle control valve and that I could tune that into the cold start of the ecu to run timing higher and more fuel.

Does anyone have thoughts on this? I dont mind doing that so that when the car fires up, its a smooth idle. But if I did need one, I dont know what options would even be there.

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby jondee86 » Fri May 15, 2020 2:45 pm

If you want your car to start and idle like any modern car you will need an idle-up valve (ISCV).
Idle speed control with ignition timing will work fine once the engine is warm or while it is
warming up, but it is not enough to get a cold engine started. For that you need extra air and
that's the reason every engine since forever has had some means of getting extra air into the
engine while cranking and immediately after it fires up.

You can get extra air in several different ways... thermostatic valve (OEM AE86 type), simple
ON/OFF solenoid valve, mechanical device to crack the throttle open (choke), PWM solenoid
valve, drive by wire throttle, or just open the throttle by using the gas pedal while cranking
(flood clear mode). If you have a racecar with a high base idle speed you can start it with a lot
of fuel and cracked throttles, and Barry may have been thinking along those lines.

But if you have a road car, unless you like keeping the engine alive by playing with the throttle
for a couple of minutes after starting, you should have an ISCV. Big question is... does your ITB
intake manifold have provision (tapped holes/spigots) in each runner for introducing idle air ?
And likewise, provision for sampling manifold vacuum to get a MAP signal for your ECU ?

Cheers... jondee86
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one
persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress
depends on the unreasonable man.

yabaiani
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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby yabaiani » Fri May 15, 2020 3:14 pm

jondee86 wrote:If you want your car to start and idle like any modern car you will need an idle-up valve (ISCV).
Idle speed control with ignition timing will work fine once the engine is warm or while it is
warming up, but it is not enough to get a cold engine started. For that you need extra air and
that's the reason every engine since forever has had some means of getting extra air into the
engine while cranking and immediately after it fires up.

You can get extra air in several different ways... thermostatic valve (OEM AE86 type), simple
ON/OFF solenoid valve, mechanical device to crack the throttle open (choke), PWM solenoid
valve, drive by wire throttle, or just open the throttle by using the gas pedal while cranking
(flood clear mode). If you have a racecar with a high base idle speed you can start it with a lot
of fuel and cracked throttles, and Barry may have been thinking along those lines.

But if you have a road car, unless you like keeping the engine alive by playing with the throttle
for a couple of minutes after starting, you should have an ISCV. Big question is... does your ITB
intake manifold have provision (tapped holes/spigots) in each runner for introducing idle air ?
And likewise, provision for sampling manifold vacuum to get a MAP signal for your ECU ?

Cheers... jondee86


Yes on the under side there are holes off each port. Barry said I would use a 1/8” npt fitting to barb off each and plumb into a vacuum chamber. Then off that chamber I can run map signal, etc and idle valve is T off just 1 of the lines.

Barry said Bosch makes a good one, but I don’t know which one to buy since they make a few different ones it looks like...

https://www.autohausaz.com/pn/818_20_91 ... gJHyfD_BwE

Bosch 0280140545 Original Equipment Idle Air Control (IAC) Valve https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001CNZCMA/re ... VEb21DN07M


Just to ask, how would I even install this and get it wired up? Do I need to modify my spare loom and hook it into the ECU? Or do I need to cut the connector and splice it in?

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby jondee86 » Fri May 15, 2020 6:50 pm

I did a quick search but couldn't find any tech data on those valves. They both look as if
they would work, but you need to confirm that they are 3-wire suitable for PWM control.
I used the stock 20V 4AGE ISCV and that has three wires. The centre wire is key switched
12V and the outer two are RSC (PWM to close) and RSO (PWM to open). The RSC and RSO
wires are connected to two PWM capable outputs on your ECU. One output is inverted.

You should be connecting to Aux Out1 and Aux Out2 and I believe the help file in your ECU
will assist with the setup.

If you have one tapping in each intake runner you need to find the barb fitting that has
the largest internal diameter and run individual hoses to your vacuum collector. These
hoses will serve the dual purpose of allowing idle air into the manifold and averaging the
vacuum signal. From the vacuum collector run individual hoses to your brake booster,
ISCV and MAP sensor. Something like this...

Image

Select suitable size barbs for the collector to match the MAP sensor hose and the hoses
from the manifold. Likewise a larger barb to suit the brake booster hose and the ISCV.
Put a pulsation damper in the MAP sensor hose. Locate the ISCV in a convenient place
either on the engine or on the chassis. Attach a small filter to the inlet side of the ISCV.
You can tee a hose to the FPR off the MAP sensor hose.

That's about it :)

Cheers... jondee86
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one
persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress
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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby yabaiani » Fri May 15, 2020 8:49 pm

jondee86 wrote:I did a quick search but couldn't find any tech data on those valves. They both look as if
they would work, but you need to confirm that they are 3-wire suitable for PWM control.
I used the stock 20V 4AGE ISCV and that has three wires. The centre wire is key switched
12V and the outer two are RSC (PWM to close) and RSO (PWM to open). The RSC and RSO
wires are connected to two PWM capable outputs on your ECU. One output is inverted.

You should be connecting to Aux Out1 and Aux Out2 and I believe the help file in your ECU
will assist with the setup.

If you have one tapping in each intake runner you need to find the barb fitting that has
the largest internal diameter and run individual hoses to your vacuum collector. These
hoses will serve the dual purpose of allowing idle air into the manifold and averaging the
vacuum signal. From the vacuum collector run individual hoses to your brake booster,
ISCV and MAP sensor. Something like this...


Select suitable size barbs for the collector to match the MAP sensor hose and the hoses
from the manifold. Likewise a larger barb to suit the brake booster hose and the ISCV.
Put a pulsation damper in the MAP sensor hose. Locate the ISCV in a convenient place
either on the engine or on the chassis. Attach a small filter to the inlet side of the ISCV.
You can tee a hose to the FPR off the MAP sensor hose.

That's about it :)

Cheers... jondee86


I believe they are suitable for 3 wire (especially the one from amazon for $138 USD). And I think I understand everything that you’re saying, but in the pulsation damper, where do I find that? I’ve searched for a few, but didnt know which one to get. Do you have any links you can send?

Also, after I get the ISCV, do I still need that other thing that you mentioned to get extra air?

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby jondee86 » Fri May 15, 2020 11:24 pm

Here it is...

Image

It's a small plastic can with a small plastic spigot on either side found in the MAP
sensor hose on many later model cars. It has a bit of foam inside and you can blow
thru it both ways. Not to be confused (as has happened) with a check valve that
looks the same but you can only blow thru it in one direction. Mainly an OEM part
so your local Toyota parts dept should be able to find you one.

If you are referring to what I called a barb fitting, that is just the adapter with a
thread on one end and a hosetail on the other. Often the vacuum collector will
come with the barbs, otherwise you should be able to buy what you need at any
speed shop or auto parts store. Just make sure you get the right thread profile so
take the collector with you when you go shopping. BSP and NPT do match in a
couple of sizes but not all, so make sure they thread in at least halfway before they
start to get tight.

Cheers... jondee86
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one
persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress
depends on the unreasonable man.

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby jondee86 » Sat May 16, 2020 1:14 am

I think you should be OK with either of those Bosch valves. The 3-wire valves should
be rotary solenoids like this diagram (actually 2-wire but works the same)...

Image

The 3-wire has two coils and when each coil is driven by a separate PWN output with
one output inverted, the solenoid is pulled by one coil and pushed by the other. Make
sure that the valve comes with the matching wiring connector. This type of Bosch valve
is common on older BMW's so should be easy to grab a bargain :) I think that the hose
outlets on the valve are either 3/4" or 20mm so you can probably get a screw-in hosetail
for your vacuum collector that steps down to 5/8" or 1/2" as 3/4" is more than you will
need for a 1600cc engine.

Cheers... jondee86
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one
persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress
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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby yabaiani » Sat May 16, 2020 4:59 am

jondee86 wrote:Here it is...



It's a small plastic can with a small plastic spigot on either side found in the MAP
sensor hose on many later model cars. It has a bit of foam inside and you can blow
thru it both ways. Not to be confused (as has happened) with a check valve that
looks the same but you can only blow thru it in one direction. Mainly an OEM part
so your local Toyota parts dept should be able to find you one.

If you are referring to what I called a barb fitting, that is just the adapter with a
thread on one end and a hosetail on the other. Often the vacuum collector will
come with the barbs, otherwise you should be able to buy what you need at any
speed shop or auto parts store. Just make sure you get the right thread profile so
take the collector with you when you go shopping. BSP and NPT do match in a
couple of sizes but not all, so make sure they thread in at least halfway before they
start to get tight.

Cheers... jondee86



I keep looking for that pulsation damper online and cannot seem to find even an example for one jondee. I keep seeing the check valve which you said is not it.

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Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby jondee86 » Sat May 16, 2020 3:04 pm

This is the actual part used on the AE111 (but not an AE111 diagram)...

Image

It is also used on a whole bunch of JDM Toyotas. It's full name is...
23265 FILTER, GAS, NO.1
90917-11009 1 $39.58


These dampers are also commonly found in a straight line in-out configuration and
anything you can find at a dealer or parts store that is used in a MAP sensor line will
do just fine. It is not a critical part, and you can run without one. But it does help
smooth out the intake manifold pressure pulsation and clean up your MAP signal.

For what it's worth I just pocketed a few different ones when searching Pick and
Pull for other parts. No-one really buys them as they don't wear out. Just be aware
that your local parts store will pull up a bunch of parts under that part number and
most of them will be wrong :) Make sure you keep your receipt !!!

Cheers... jonndee86
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one
persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress
depends on the unreasonable man.

yabaiani
Club4AG Enthusiast
Posts: 105
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013 8:28 am

Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby yabaiani » Sat May 16, 2020 4:15 pm

jondee86 wrote:This is the actual part used on the AE111 (but not an AE111 diagram)...



It is also used on a whole bunch of JDM Toyotas. It's full name is...
23265 FILTER, GAS, NO.1
90917-11009 1 $39.58


These dampers are also commonly found in a straight line in-out configuration and
anything you can find at a dealer or parts store that is used in a MAP sensor line will
do just fine. It is not a critical part, and you can run without one. But it does help
smooth out the intake manifold pressure pulsation and clean up your MAP signal.

For what it's worth I just pocketed a few different ones when searching Pick and
Pull for other parts. No-one really buys them as they don't wear out. Just be aware
that your local parts store will pull up a bunch of parts under that part number and
most of them will be wrong :) Make sure you keep your receipt !!!

Cheers... jonndee86



Got it jondee. So is it this?

https://parts.swopetoyota.com/oem-parts ... 9091711009

https://www.toyotapartsdeal.com/oem/toy ... 11009.html

https://parts.toyota.com/p/FILTER--GAS- ... 11037.html

https://parts.toyota.com/p/Toyota__/FIL ... 11027.html

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jondee86
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Posts: 2582
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2013 10:21 pm
Location: Wellington, New Zealand

Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby jondee86 » Sat May 16, 2020 5:35 pm

This one should do the job...

Image
https://www.toyotapartsdeal.com/oem/toy ... 01014.html
VALVE, VACUUM TRANSMITTING
Toyota 90925-01014 VALVE, VACUUM TRANSMITTING
Part Description Valve, Vacuum Transmitting, NO.1

Bit more of a pancake shape but same thing :)

Cheers... jondee86
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one
persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress
depends on the unreasonable man.

Nick94tt
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Posts: 157
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 9:43 am

Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby Nick94tt » Sat May 16, 2020 5:39 pm

Could easily bend up a manifold with the appropriate fittings to link all the runners, booster, and map sensor and add stainless steel pot scrubbers (commonly used in reflux distillation heads - and kitchens, lol)

Some spare aluminum/steel sheet and free time with a welder.

Basically just building a muffler for pressure pulses.

yabaiani
Club4AG Enthusiast
Posts: 105
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013 8:28 am

Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby yabaiani » Sat May 16, 2020 9:40 pm

jondee86 wrote:This one should do the job...

Image
https://www.toyotapartsdeal.com/oem/toy ... 01014.html
VALVE, VACUUM TRANSMITTING
Toyota 90925-01014 VALVE, VACUUM TRANSMITTING
Part Description Valve, Vacuum Transmitting, NO.1

Bit more of a pancake shape but same thing :)

Cheers... jondee86


Got it. I’ll buy that one. I see it on eBay for $37 shipped which is good. Now on the connector for the idle control, I was thinking about this and then figuring out where to splice it into the loom.

https://www.amazon.com/Michigan-Motorsp ... ive&sr=1-6


Here is the idle air controller: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001CNZCMA/re ... WEbJK6DA8N

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jondee86
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Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2013 10:21 pm
Location: Wellington, New Zealand

Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby jondee86 » Sun May 17, 2020 12:32 am

I have no idea how this custom loom works, so I can only comment in general.
There should be one wire from every pin in the ECU plug and you will need to locate
the wires for Aux Outputs 1 and 2. I believe that you must use these PWM capable
outputs for controlling your ISCV. Then you will need to check if the wires are long
enough to route from the ECU mounting location to the ISCV mounting location.

You will likely have an engine loom that has wires for the gauge temp sensor and
ECU temp sensor running down the intake side of the engine. The MAP sensor and
ISCV wires can most likely be run together with temp sensor wires. You will also
need to run a key switched 12V supply to the ISCV. Depending on how your wiring
is setup, this 12V could likely came from the same relay that powers up the 12V
supply to the COP's.

Image

The ISCV will need some kind of mounting bracket or clamp arrangement to hold
it securely in position. And that position should be reasonably close to both the
vacuum collector and ITB's. So maybe there is a spot on the intake side firewall
or inner guard ?

Cheers... jondee86
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one
persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress
depends on the unreasonable man.

yabaiani
Club4AG Enthusiast
Posts: 105
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013 8:28 am

Re: Engine Break In Period + ITB Installation Considerations

Postby yabaiani » Sun May 17, 2020 9:13 am

Got it Jondee. I’ll take some photos of my loom here pretty soon and post it up!

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