Suspension upgrades that are a must.

E_Money
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Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby E_Money » Sat Jan 26, 2013 10:51 pm

I need to know what suspension upgrades are a must for the corolla gt-s. Thanks.

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Tora
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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby Tora » Sun Jan 27, 2013 2:40 am

Um... a must for grocery runs and commutes? Track-only? Balling on a budget: Tokiko Blues on stock springs (don't cut them), a full bushing refresh, and maybe some strut braces.

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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby E_Money » Sun Jan 27, 2013 8:32 am

Tora wrote:Um... a must for grocery runs and commutes? Track-only? Balling on a budget: Tokiko Blues on stock springs (don't cut them), a full bushing refresh, and maybe some strut braces.


For all of the above. Best suspension upgrade for daily driving, track, and drift thats best for the buck.

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Jeonsah
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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby Jeonsah » Sun Jan 27, 2013 8:40 am

Coilovers
Struts
panhard bar
camber plates
RCA's
rear springs

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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby oldeskewltoy » Sun Jan 27, 2013 9:31 am

springs.... make the ratio 3 to 2 favoring the front. I'm running 300# springs up front, and 200# springs in the rear. If you are looking for a wee bit more oversteer(easier to initiate a drift) you might try 4 to 3 ratio

bushings.... make sure they are in good condition, it is doubtful you can still get TRD bushings... if you can they are well worth their cost. There are other bushings out there (Super Pro, Prothane, Energy Suspension) but few are high density rubber, most are urethane. The high density rubber is better for most applications......

Shocks.... ideally you can find adjustables... MOST adjustables are going to cost you around $400-$600. Koni, Tokico make adjustables...
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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby Deuce Cam » Sun Jan 27, 2013 11:09 am

^What he said. Go through and replace all the old bushings and other worn suspension parts like struts, ball joints, tie rods, etc. Now is a good time to upgrade the old worn out stuff that needs replacing to aftermarket performance parts. The full prothane bushings kit will give you the best bang for the buck with the suspension, I'd start there.

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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby E_Money » Sun Jan 27, 2013 12:48 pm

By bushings do you mean the wheel bearings / hub bearings?

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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby BlackStar » Sun Jan 27, 2013 1:08 pm

E_Money wrote:By bushings do you mean the wheel bearings / hub bearings?


no, bushings meaning front control arm bushings, rear axles control arm bushing, sway bar,steering rack bushings. The suspension bits that move have insulation surrounding the bolt(this bolt also connects to the car) that insulation does where out, hence why it is a good idea to replace them. I did a full set of poleurethane for a mear $100. It takes time, but it's well worth it


However, new wheel bearings would be a good idea, that is going to be my next move, along with new rotors

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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby Tora » Sun Jan 27, 2013 4:21 pm

For shocks, I've been running Tokiko Blues for about five years. If I swapped my uncut stock springs for lower Megan or TRD springs, would that put too much stress on the non-adjustable Blue shocks? My current thinking is that waiting and upgrading springs and shocks at the same time would be a better approach.

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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby ronny » Mon Jan 28, 2013 1:31 pm

everything you can buy is needed.. HAHA
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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby DLish » Mon Jan 28, 2013 1:39 pm

Merry Motoring !!!!!!

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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby Jeonsah » Mon Jan 28, 2013 5:49 pm

This subject is purely subjective. If you are starting to race the car for the first time, then you should be starting out with the stock suspension with all the parts in good shape. This will ideally teach you everything about how the car tends to handle. It will also teach you what suspension upgrades you will want/need depending on your current/desired driving style. Tension rods, four links, etc are just extra upgrades that should be considered later.

Tsuchiya even explains that you just need a basic suspension and if you have some extra cash, then a seat, steering wheel, shift knob, and lsd should be considered. I have done several auto x events with just one of my stock cars and it does teach you exactly how to drive the car. Do not worry about the fancy shiney parts that some of the members are listing. I would start off with a suspension that contains the following:

coilovers
struts
camber plates
roll center adjusters
rear springs
lateral bar
bushing kit

This is the perfect starting point for a beginning driver. I highly recommend you go this route.

Vic

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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby mikeyee » Mon Jan 28, 2013 8:41 pm

What good is it when you don't know what each part does for your driving?

drive drive drive drive. max your car's abilities, and get a feel for what changes in parts you think are needed to suit your driving.

unless none of that matters to you; and are just building the typical cookie cutter corolla for cool points when flossing at meets.

http://www.mestiso.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=424

AE86 Aftermarket Suspension parts information & explanations. The basics on what they do, and how they work. I put it in my own words (laymen terms) as best as I could, so hopefully its easily understandable to everyone. So here's the short list, as I'm not going to be going into everything available or possible.


Feel free to post a correction if I'm wrong somewhere, or if you have something to add (more parts may be added to the list at a later date).

Enjoy,
Andrew

Also, just because you read some of the benefits of these parts here. Don't expect to be able to buy any of these parts and be able to instantly utilize the advantages they give you. That comes from seat time/experience, and to some degree talent. (IE: just because you have the parts, don't expect to be the next Alex Pfeiffer, Taka Aono or Keiichi Tsuchiya.)



___________________________________________________________________________



Tension Rods :

Because of a rod end which is a solid (non-complience) pivot point on most aftermarket tension rods you get a much more controlled front control arm 'arc' or movement. And also more importantly no excessive fore/aft (front/back) movement under braking, acceleration, turning and any other vehicle manuevers.

They will also allow you to adjust your caster much easier, and more precisely than factory bushings.

You will get much better turn-in (steering response), steering feedback through the steering wheel, and better braking feedback & response.



RCA (Roll Center Adjuster) :

Helps to correct roll center on lowered cars, by changing the lower control arm angle. This change affects how the suspension handles the forces exterted by the car. Resulting in a better handling car, due to better weight transfer characteristics.

Also, due to the AE86's suspension/steering design a RCA/NCRCA when it corrects the control arm angle, it also changes/corrects bump steer. As when it spaces down the control arm it also spaces down the steering knuckle and tierod end mounting point. So you end up with a smoother more controllable vehicle.




NCRCA (Negative Camber - Roll Center Adjuster) :

Adds more Negative Camber, by spacing the front struts outwards at the bottom (hence the NC in NCRCA).

Helps to correct roll center by changing the control arm angle (see above for more info).

Also, due to the AE86's suspension/steering design an NCRCA/RCA when it corrects the control arm angle, it also changes/corrects bump steer. As when it spaces down the control arm it also spaces down the steering knuckle and tierod end mounting point.

Because of its design, the NCRCA spaces the front struts out from the ball joint/pivot point. Which widens the front track, IE: the point of the contact patches the tires make. Wider usually equals more stable in turns, but just remember the rear hasn't been widened, so this change will affect the handling of the vehicle. It will provide better turn in and front grip throughout a turn, but you may have to change your setup or add spacers to the rear wheels to compensate, it would depend on your desired handling characteristics.

Changes your scrub radius. The track width increase occurs on &/or past the pivot point (IE: lower ball joint) so when you turn the wheel it rotates in a wider path around the pivot point. It will give you more 'feedback' through the steering wheel as the extra length provides extra leverage for road irregularities to feed back throuth the tierods/rack/column to your hands on the steering wheel. It also means that if you hit large bumps/potholes/debris/ect it will also fight your hands from holding the steering wheel a little bit more. But that isn't a big deal at all, just something you have to get used to.

Changes your SAI (steering angle inclination) which can be good or bad, but in this case it's good on the ae86 chassis when lowered (afaik, I'm not too up on my suspension geometry/theory/ect. So I'd recommend you do some research to really understand this) This makes the steering wheel feel a little lighter in your hands when turning (IIRC).



Camber Plates :

Fairly self explanatory, they replace the factory strut top mounts and provide a sliding adjustable mounting point that allows you to change the camber of the front wheels. On average you can get up to 2.5-3.5 degrees of camber from just camber plates, or you can correct out to 0 degrees on a lowered car if thats what you wish to do.

As a side note, you will probably only be able to get around 2.3-2.8 degrees of camber max with full size replacement lowering springs (IE: TRD race, Swift, KGMM, Eibach, Whiteline, ect). Because the full size spring & factory spring hats will come into contact with the strut tower before you are able to get adjustment beyond that point.



Sway bars/Sway bar links :

A.Simply said swaybars/stabilizar bars help keep the left & right suspension to compress or expand at similar times, to keep the car more flat when cornerning/drifting/lateral G's are applied. How well they do this, how fast it occurs, and how much motion it transfers from one side to the other is a product of: Different bar size (thickness), designs (solid or hollow & how many bends), materials, and the bushings/how its mounted all affect how each will work.

B. Swaybar links are a link between the control arm, axle or other suspension component which attatches it to the swaybar/stabilizer bar. They transfer the movement/motion of the susp/axle on one side of the vehicle to the swaybar, and then from there to the other side of the cars susp/axle.

Again, different materials/design affect them. And they in turn affect how well the swaybar/stabilizer will work depending on what material is used in the construction of the link. Rubber bushings on the stock links deform under load and that deformation translates into additional load needing to be applied to the links before the swaybar/stabilizer bar will even start to work. Polyurethane deforms less so and is a good upgrade. Going to a solid type of setup like rod ends/heim joints or even specially designed ball sockets will provide no flex and almost instant repsonse.



5-link (Rear control arms and lateral/panhard bar) :

Upgrading your bushings to TRD rubber or polyurethane with help eliminate excessive complience (unwanted play) in your rear suspension.

Going to an aftermarket 5-link which has delrin, polyurethane and/or rod ends further eliminates complience while also in many cases providing an adjustable link. On the 4-link you can use this adjustment to correct rear differential pinion angle. This also allows you to the wheel base (axle position, front/back) a little if you felt like it. On the lateral/panhard rod the adjustment allows you to correctly center your rear differential (or in alignment/racing terms set your thrust angle).

More in-depth info here: http://www.club4ag.com/faq%20and%20tech ... ersion.htm



Traction Brackets :

Installing these on lowered AE86's corrects the rear lower control arms (lower 4-link) geometry. What they do is change the angle the arm/link sits at, when it does that it allows the car to better apply a downward force on accel via the tires to the ground. Basically the suspension pushes against the car and forces the tire downwards, resulting in increased traction. It's something thats mostly noticed on acceleration.

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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby Zenki85 » Mon Jan 28, 2013 9:32 pm

Everyone's getting to crazy with a whole list. Save for some coilovers. Then get a manual rack. Then from there add more suspension parts like ncrca traction rods etc. but having good coils or short stroke shocks and some swift or Trd springs and you will enjoy the car
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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby E_Money » Mon Jan 28, 2013 9:56 pm

i really appreciate everyones input. I put this thread out so I can get a feel for what I should do and acquire lots amd lots of research. As some of you know I am new to the toyota series and the corollas. I just need a sense of direction in what I can upgrade that makes this car drive better.

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Re: Suspension upgrades that are a must.

Postby Jeonsah » Tue Jan 29, 2013 9:15 am

Do not buy NRCA's only buy RCA's. NRCA's create a space between the bottom of the spindle and the ball joint ( i believe). This extra space causes the car to have unpredictable handling in some cases.... such as bumpsteer. There was a whole document on this in one of the magazines. But yeah, stay with standard RCA's.

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